There are no Rules in Cool School of Gardening
October 7, 2010
Allan in Garden Ideas, Gardening, Linda Chalker-Scott, Musings on Gardening, Stephanie Cohen, Tom Fischer, garden habits, garden rules, garden solutions, new school of gardening, newbie gardeners, old school gardeners, traditional gardeners

I was scrolling through a fellow gardener’s blog when I came upon a photo of her front yard. Protruding out of the lawn were several rocks and I admired how much they added character to the landscape. Another colleague noticed the same photo and was unimpressed. Her opinion was that the rocks had to be removed. It was then that I realized I was participating in a clash between old school and cool school.

There are rules and habits that some traditional gardeners follow that will cause younger, busy people to turn away from horticulture. Old school gardeners tend to venerate old masters whose experience and advice they admire. Cool school gardeners consider these sages to be stale and anachronistic. Another source of concern is the newbie gardener who has managed to memorize all there is to know about gardening from a recently read book, even if that book is outdated. Sometimes garden books become outdated; a few by virtue of their style of writing and a few by the laborious methods that they recommend to busy, impatient readers.

Advancing technologies increasingly shape the kind of world we live in. As a result, we have experienced significant changes in lifestyles, values, priorities, and the way we transmit and collect useful information. Nature, of course, does not change but the manner and perspective that we bring to dealing with nature does. Some of us have little time to garden or to research botanical information due to many obligations we cultivate at home, in community and in the workplace. Because all converge to place severe demands on time available, a short cut to accomplishing anything is often appreciated.

In the last fifteen years, we have experienced an exponential growth in the numbers of people who have discovered the pleasures of gardening. Among the new adherents are independent thinkers who are unencumbered by other peoples’ rules. They bring to their new-found passion either irreverence for tradition or a desire for the immediacy usually found in technology. These new gardeners reflect the fact  that North America is a continent of innovative people. Many look for newer, more efficient ways to accomplish traditional goals. This population worships the future, more than it venerates the past. Its members are legitimate representatives of a forward-looking society. That perspective has allowed some of them to conclude, about gardening, that there are few absolute truths and hardly any sacred rules. Welcome to the new, cool school of gardening.

 Here are a few aspects of the changing attitudes about gardening:-

The way to a beautiful garden may be a never-ending journey but the path we choose is a personal one. Some of my fellow bloggers prefer to perpetuate traditional gardening techniques either because they experience a kind of spirituality in the older, patient methods or because they are more comfortable with the true and tried. On the other hand, some newer weekend botanists, harried by their lifestyle, look for quick fixes in order to create instant flowerbeds. Both approaches bring their respective adherents enormous pleasure. That is why gardeners should never be admonished for the choices they make. For this blogger to write such words is a veritable reversal of position. I am the one who warned his readers to consider the neighbors by never gardening in poor taste. Now I consider it more important to respect colleagues who choose to garden without restrictions. In a society, unfettered by social convention, we garden as we please.

Article originally appeared on Garden Design, Montreal, Perennial Flower Gardens, Gardening Tips, Gardening Advice, Gardening Book Reviews (
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