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Allan designs and plants flowering gardens in Montreal, Zone 5 [USDA Zone 4] .

See website, design work and favorite flowering plants at  gardengurumontreal.ca

Consultation and coaching for do-it-yourselfers is provided. Occasional emailed questions are welcome and answered free of charge. Oui, je parle francais.

See my work on Pinterest at Garden Guru Montreal

Entries in ornamental gardens (2)

Monday
Oct242011

The Elephant in the Garden Room

Gardening is not an equal opportunity hobby. Perennials, roses, rhododendrons and flowering shrubs can be costly to some, yet inconsequentially inexpensive to others. In some countries, even organic-rich black earth is considered a luxury.

When I first began gardening, beautiful plants were available only by mail order. Each season, I would budget for plants a portion of the college money that I had earned during the previous summer. Because these funds had to underwrite an entire year of school, the amount I spent on gardening was modest. As a result, the number of perennials that I was able to add  to my garden each season was paltry.

Occasionally, a neighbor would give me a cutting of a perennial, but since city gardeners in those days knew of only twelve perennials, flowerbeds were uninspiring without supplementary mail order plants. Later in life, when gardening became a second career, I was able to comfortably buy plants to my heart’s content because I now shopped wholesale, But until then, all garden purchases had been measured and re considered, ensuring  that my resources were wisely spent.

The other option that was always available was growing plants from seed. However, urban living in a crowded, central-heated home, in a cold climate, did not offer the appropriate physical environment for the successful germination of seeds.

Ordering expensive plants by mail was the only way that I, and most other people, could expand our flowerbeds. That option remained constant until the arrival of two commercial phenomena that changed the way ordinary people gardened.

The combination of the credit card and the big box store brought ornamental gardening to those with limited resources. All that was required was to select a desirable object, place it in a shopping cart, and pay an ostensibly modest, but deceptively high, monthly charge to the credit card company.

Big box stores also brought seemingly affordable and eye catching horticultural products to the mass market. By displaying temptingly, blooming plants to a consumer who had arrived to buy light bulbs, these behemoth retailers instantly, turned unsuspecting do-it-yourselfers into gardeners, and a new target market of gardener-consumer was born.

This historical commercial development deflects the fact that without the generosity of others who offer free plant cuttings, and without the opportunity or time to grow perennials from seed, ornamental gardening remains - in real dollars - an expensive hobby for a sizeable portion of the population.

Publishers and writers never acknowledge this enormous elephant in the room – the fact that some gardeners can’t afford to buy the plants we write about. We discuss “how-to”, and “what is new”; often we recommend spending more than necessary because a costlier plant will yield out-of-proportionally spectacular results -  for only a few dollars more  In our sincerity and zeal to share all of our best gardening tips with as many people as possible, sometimes we forget that our advice is not appropriate for all gardeners.

That is because ornamental gardening crosses socioeconomic lines; it gives pleasure to everyone, regardless of one’s station in life. Consequently, there will always be some, desiring to recreate that pleasure in their own back yard, who will find themselves hard pressed to allocate finite resources to infinite garden dreams.

Thursday
Feb102011

"Perennial Meadows": a New Gardening Blog

Image used with the permission of Michael KingThe perennial meadow is a variation of the prairie or meadow garden. In some parts of North America, where growing conditions are favorable, the meadow garden is slowly becoming an alternative landscape treatment to the expansive, rolling lawn. Some brave urban dwellers have also begun experimenting with it in their front and back yards. Using attractive photos of his work, a new garden blogger, demonstrates how he tackles this innovative planting style in moist Zone 7.

Image used with the permission of Michael KingMichael King is a garden designer, author and garden photographer. Book titles to his credit include Gardening with Grasses [written with Piet Oudolf], Gardening with Tulips, and Perennial Garden Design. In addition to a joint honors degree in Botany and Microbiology, he trained as an accountant and in the1980’s won the plum position as head of finance and administration at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in London, UK. For the last 20 years, Mr. King has been living in the Netherlands, specializing in perennials, ornamental grasses and tulips. His blog focuses on aesthetically planted meadows. The writing is delightful and he supplies more detailed information about the perennial meadow designing/ planting process than is readily available anywhere else online. Instead of suggesting what we might do, he shows us how he does it. This refreshing blog is aptly titled Perennial Meadows. Click here to visit his site.